Why Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy?

 

Guidlines provided, for the National Health Service (NHS) ,by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) suggest Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy (CBT) as the recommended treatment for depressive and anxiety disorders.

 

CBT has been extensively researched and has been shown to be the most effective form of treatment for a range of psychological disorders.

It is also a cost effective form of treatment as most disorders can be treated between 8 and 20 sessions depending on the individual's circumstances.

 

Whilst CBT can be offered to some individuals free of charge on the NHS, waiting lists appear to be long and therefore some may seek out a CBT therapist privately.

What is Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy?

 

CBT helps an individual to understand how their thoughts and behaviour relate to the way they feel and how this might contribute to their presenting difficulties. CBT can therefore help with your difficulties by changing the way you think and behave which in turn will help with the way you feel.

 

CBT is a talking therapy that recognises the individual as the expert of themself. The therapist and individual work collaboratively throughout the process.

 

CBT focuses on how you feel in the present but may also look to the past to better understand how past experiences may have had an impact on how you view  yourself, others and the world.

Taline Al-Jawad MSc

020 3488 1684
talinecbt@gmail.com